Quote of the day:

…from Glenn Reynolds:

…normally when one has lost the Executive and Legislative branches to the other party is not the time to call for government censorship of political speech on vague and mutable grounds.

Democrats have been advocating more and more power to government without giving thought to how that power would be used in the wrong hands.

It seems some Democrats, in spite of the results of the election, still aren't thinking in those terms.

Hot tip from a Libertarian: Treat your rivals the same way you want to be treated BY your rivals.

Related:

Source: https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/251347/

Ketchup and the Two-Party Problem

A defense of third-party politics.

Seth Godin wrote about third parties in a blog post "Ketchup and the third-party problem". He says that those of us supporting third parties or their candidates are doomed to failure, and miss our chance to really influence the political field.

Needless to say, I find the arguement lacking, and merely a more passive aggressive method of saying that we should all vote for Hillary because otherwise we'll be doomed with Trump. I've snarked about it on Twitter. But I feel this deserves a bit more detailed of a rebuttal.

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The new Ghostbusters: I liked it so much...

…that I wrote over fifteen hundred words about theories about wether it was really a reboot or not.

Click through to read it, but bewarned there are SPOILERS!!! 

But also NO POLITICS!!! (You're welcome, though I may get into that in a later post)

Click through only if you've seen the movie.

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A non-fiction comic that's an insult to comics.

Apple is currently holding their annual World-Wide Developer Conference in San Fancisco. As part of this, Apple has released a new version of the guidelines that developers have to follow to submit apps to their various app stores.

These text of these guidelines are available on Apple's developer website. But it also is available as a comic book, by Motion Books, a motion comic company with apps on various platforms.

If you want the comic, you can find a link to the PDF here. However, I'd advise against wasting the bandwidth on downloading it.

In the App Review Guidelines Comic Book, this Pokemon-like fight has nothing to do with the captions or "dialog", not even as an extended metaphor. The art does nothing to help the reader understand the concepts in the text.

In the App Review Guidelines Comic Book, this Pokemon-like fight has nothing to do with the captions or "dialog", not even as an extended metaphor. The art does nothing to help the reader understand the concepts in the text.

This "comic" is pointless. It's merely superimposing the App Store guidelines over visuals that have nothing to do with the App Store, or anything in the common with the text at all. It's comic art that may actually be used elsewhere in the service of an actual story somewhere else in the world, as each section of the guidlines is in a different art style and story genre (none of which are non-fiction).

Compare with Google's 2008 comic that introduced the Chrome web browser to the world, and the technologies within. It was a good book that illustrated the concepts behind the Chrome browser, written and drawn by Scott McCloud, well known in the comics world for his other non-fiction comics on understanding the visual grammar and structure of comic books, most notably "Understanding Comics".

In this sample from Scott McCloud's Google Chrome comic, the visuals serve the narrative of explaining the nature and benefits of sandboxing in Google Chrome.

In this sample from Scott McCloud's Google Chrome comic, the visuals serve the narrative of explaining the nature and benefits of sandboxing in Google Chrome.

The App Review Guidlines comic is a pointless non-sequitur that does nothing to improve understanding or knowledge of the App Store Review guidelines over the text itself.

It's like listening to the legal disclaimers for a drug ad while an action movie scene plays on screen. Two things that have nothing to do with one another.

Since it was created by Motion Books, a motion comic company with apps on various platforms, I imagine it was meant as a means of promoting themselves. They failed in my eyes as this shows them to have no creativity or communication skills at all, if this comic is any indication.

It's insulting to the audience, and to those who have actually produced real non-fiction comics. I'm stunned that Apple agreed to put it on their developer site.

via iMore

Culture War Profiteer exposed

In case you are wondering what I meant by "culture war profiteer," in the previous post, I refer you to Todd Seavy at Splice Today

The anarchist law professor Butler Shaffer, a friend of mine, quietly takes the very radical yet reasonable view that most institutions, no matter what their initial purpose was (stopping online harassers, spreading the word about Jesus, what have you) end up, through a simple evolutionary filtering process, having the same de facto mission in the end: self-perpetuation. Think about that for a few minutes and then become very skeptical if you weren’t already.

That tendency toward the self-serving is worth keeping in mind the next time you find yourself asking, as decent, naïve folk naturally do, why on Earth would campus anti-racism activists secretly scrawl racist graffiti? Why would a leftist gay person fake receiving an anti-gay cake? Darwin used to be popular on the left before the feminists took a dislike to him, and he knew the name of the game is usually self-preservation. Adaptive camouflage is just one tactic.

The article is primarily about a feminist posing as an anti-feminist online to gain sympathy and support for herself, and to hurt her rival feminists.

Bonus points for the post's sub-heading, "SHIELD is Hydra. Hydra is SHIELD."

Trump on the North Carolina Pissing Contest

How weird is it getting? Trump's acting like the reasonable one here.

From Reason:

Asked about the big culture-war issue of the moment, public restroom access for trans individuals, Trump said he thinks North Carolina should have left things alone. "North Carolina did something that was very strong, and they're paying a big price," said Trump. But if it was up to him, he would "leave [bathroom access] the way it is! There have been very few problems. There have been very few complaints the way it is. People go, they use the bathroom that they feel is appropriate, there has been so little trouble."

Yeah, both sides have been making WAY too much over this "issue". I suspect there are culture war profiteers on both sides trying to stir this up.

"When the going gets weird…"

Image from Gary Johnson, used under Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Licence

Image from Gary Johnson, used under Creative Commons 2.0 Generic Licence

In every presidential election I've voted in (every one since 1992), I've had only one surefire prediction that holds up almost every time: Anything can happen, and damn near everything will happen.

It's usually a safe bet. Some races get so weird that I declare them races where anything can happen, and everything (no matter how implausible) will happen.

1992 was one such race, with Ross Perot becoming a credible candidate, dropping out mid-race, and dropping back in not too long afterwards.

2000 only mildly weird… until election day itself. Nothing like a looming constitutional crisis to spice up a dull election season.

2016 is already a weird one, and we haven't even gotten a single ballot cast yet, much less even arrived in the year 2016 itself!

It could be so weird that the likely Libertarian nominee could run as the "normal" candidate, as observed by Todd Seavey at Splice Today:

I mean, if the Republicans end up offering someone as odd as Trump or Carson, and the Democrats offer a criminal such as Clinton or a socialist such as Sanders... couldn’t Johnson plausibly just run as the non-weird candidate for whom America has been waiting?

Johnson, after all, is a successful, smart, and respected former two-term governor of New Mexico, elected and re-elected as a Republican even in a majority-Democrat state. He never raised taxes even when building new highways, shrank the budget, vetoed more legislation (from both parties) than any other governor, created more jobs than Rick Perry’s Texas despite occasional claims to the contrary, and let the state government workforce shrink through attrition as workers retired—probably the least-painful way to deal with public-sector bloat.

Source: http://www.splicetoday.com/politics-and-me...

The $750 Pill: Corporate Greed, Excessive Regulation—or Both?

Photo credit: TaxRebate.org.uk; used under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license ; Photo has been modified for use here.

Photo credit: TaxRebate.org.uk; used under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license ; Photo has been modified for use here.

Dr. Mary Ruwart

Why, you might ask, can Shkreli price his drug so high and not fear that a generic competitor will undercut him? After all, the daraprim no longer has patent protection. The answer: Turing Pharmaceuticals has a de facto monopoly, courtesy of the ever-increasing costs of gaining FDA approval, both for new drugs (over $1 billion and 11 years) and generics. Any generic company could make daraprim; its patent expired decades ago.

The $750 pill might be considered an example of “corporate greed.” However, Turing probably wouldn’t have even attempted such a price hike without high cost of FDA-mandated drug development, both new and generic, which virtually eliminated his competition.

Hat tip to Independent Political Report